Friday, February 16, 2018

Week of February 12th - 16th

TA’s Notes:
***Please do not send in any food to be shared among Voyager students***
***Please notify us if your child has strep.  Thank you for this courtesy.***

Voyager Homework Club- Tuesdays (2:00-3:30pm) and Wednesdays (3:00-4:30pm)

Plea from Ms. Sherman on Behalf of Voyager!!!
On March 24th, we will have our annual Voyager Recycle sale. This is an epic fundraiser for us, but it can’t be done without the help of our awesome Voyager families!!! Below are some things to think about concerning the sale:

  • Drop Off of Stuff: March 23rd (6pm-8pm-WCS Cafeteria)
  • When: March 24th (Saturday) Sale opens at 9:00 and closes around 12:00
  • What Kind of Stuff to Donate:High quality, resaleable and reusable goods…..items of good value that will generate higher profits from our efforts
  • How to Help Out: Volunteer at drop off, during the sale, donate goods and food for concessions, or help with clean up and haul away of left-over goods. Sign up sheets will sent out soon.
  • Contact for More Info: kfieldsend@cvsdvt.org or cobrien@cvsdvt.org
Dear Families,

We wanted to reach out to let you know that we had a few confirmed cases of Flu in Voyager House over the last week.
In an effort to reduce the spread of illness, we ask that you keep your sick child home until they are healthy (fever-free x 24 hours without medicine), reinforce the importance of covering coughs and sneezes with an elbow or tissue, and encourage your child to wash hands often and well. At school, we are reinforcing good hand and cough hygiene and cleaning in work spaces.

Please let the Health Office know if your child is sick with flu-like illness or if he or she has been diagnosed with influenza. If you have any questions, we encourage you to call your child's pediatrician or refer to the resources we've shared below.

Be well,
Maria and Carol

How do I know...Is it a cold or the flu?
http://www.healthvermont.gov/sites/default/files/documents/2016/12/INFO_ColdOrFlu%3F_Flyer.pdf

Treatment:
http://www.healthvermont.gov/immunizations-infectious-disease/influenza/treatment

CDC:
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm

The Week in Mr. Merrill’s Room (⅚ Humanities):
Literature Groups: Students should be finishing their literature group book and preparing to write a LEAF essay next week.

Current Events: Students wrote a summary of a news event reported on the weekly news show.

US History: We kicked off our Westward Expansion unit. Students brainstormed a timeline of events and compared a political map of North America in 1763 to a map of North America in 1804. We will begin a mini unit on Lewis and Clark next week.

Narrative Writing: Students selected a “seed” idea from their writer’s notebooks to launch the story they will publish for our open house in March. Students wrote a flash draft, and then were asked to rewrite - not revise, with the hope of capturing the true, big meaning behind their story.

Guest Speaker: Sarah Healy, author and Voyager parent, talked about the writing process and her experiences as a writer. She shared many great writing tips and strategies, answered questions, and led a story mapping activity.


The Week in Ms. O’s Room (⅚ Math & Science):

Math 5:  We had a productive week wrapping up Unit 4 and reviewing concepts from the unit.  Students have taken their final Post Assessment and scores will be posted soon.  We extended our human body learning into math this week by running several reaction speed investigations.  Students were led through a series of tests in which students collected data on what happens to your eye when the lights are out and then turned out (pupillary reaction) and on how fast (or slow) their reaction time was when catching a falling meter stick.  We collected data for a student’s reaction time when given a countdown from five, when given no countdown, with eyes open or closed and with the dominant or nondominant hand catching the meter stick.  It was eye opening to kids to see how reaction time changes given verbal or visual cues.  We also graphed this data as shown below and made claims.

Math 6:  Students finished up Covering and Surrounding this week to show their current level of understanding for area and perimeter of polygons.  Assessment results soon!  We extended our human body learning into math this week by running several reaction speed investigations.  Students were led through a series of tests in which students collected data on what happens to your eye when the lights are out and then turned out (pupillary reaction) and on how fast (or slow) their reaction time was when catching a falling meter stick.  We collected data for a student’s reaction time when given a countdown from five, when given no countdown, with eyes open or closed and with the dominant or nondominant hand catching the meter stick.  It was eye opening to kids to see how reaction time changes given verbal or visual cues.  We also graphed this data as shown below and made claims.
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⅚ Science:
I mean what can I say?  The photos speak for themselves.  I’m so grateful for all of our parent collaborators.  I learned so much from you and I know the kids did too!  Thank you!



The We

The Week in Mr. Roof’s Room (⅞ Humanities):
ELA: This week, the focus was on complex sentences. We have been engrossed in the components of, and differences between independent and dependent clauses, and how they are used in simple, compound, and complex sentences. This work was supported by online learning and practice, and assessed on the weekly reading log. We also constructed a review quiz show style game and formed teams to play it during class. We proved that we are a very competitive bunch!  Weekly independent reading was supported by reading log 22. Additionally, we began work on Book Recommendation #3. Students will design their own cover for a book that they really enjoyed reading this trimester. They will then write a summary. We will share these late next week.

SS: In social studies, students worked very hard to perfect their slides to accompany their world culture presentations. We are very focused on perfecting our public speaking skills so that our presentations are amazing!  We will begin presentations next week, which is exciting. They will take place most days from 10:30-11:15 and 1:50-2:50. Come on in if you’d like.






The Week from Ms. Q’s Room (⅞ Math & Science):
CMP8
This week we continued geometric constructions showing different forms of rotation: translation, reflection and rotation.  Some really great work was done by students.  Here is an example of a student showing how they found the center point of a rotation of a figure.
Before: After:
We then took a break to do a geometry task from Jo Boaler’s website called “One Cut Geometry”.
The premise is to figure out how to cut out different geometric figures from the center of a square with one cut.  There is actually a theorem that proves how this works.  Students engaged in trying multiple strategies.  We celebrated successes and mistakes!
Josh Perkins led the class through how to cut out a scalene triangle that he was able to master!  
We discussed how to keep engaged even when you get frustrated.

CMP7
We finished up our “Blow it Up and Shrink it Down” images this week along with a few re-teaching moments on scaling and indirect measurement.  We hope to have our work displayed on our walls over the next week.


Science 7th/8th
(Darwin’s Finches)
“Survival of the fittest” was played out right in Voyager Kiva.  Hungry birds with different beak types struggled to get enough food to survive for the next generation.  Each student received a beak type and had to collect beetles, worms, twigs and seeds in order to survive.  Some beaks were very adaptable to the food that was present in the kiva environment and some beaks were not well equipped.  The birds that were fed well survived to live another day.  Students created graphs and analyzed the meaning of their data.  It was a very lively simulation.  We finished the week off with an evolution project that focuses on how organisms change over time.  Make sure to check out Google Classroom for details.